ESPN's Jemele Hill Under Fire After Social Media Backlash

ESPN's Jemele Hill Under Fire After Social Media Backlash

Let me just start by saying I though 2016 was going to revolutionize the way in which athletes, coaches and media personnel use social media. The ability for the world to see exactly what you are thinking, doing and saying can have major consequences… Especially when you have 386,000 people viewing what you said.

ESPN’s Jemele Hill (His & Her’s) tweeted out Monday night during the 2016 National Championship a picture of Alabama RB Derrick Henry side by side with former Heisman Trophy Winner and New Orleans Saints RB Mark Ingram quoting:

AND the response from Ingram:

Now don’t get me wrong, everyone loves a classic Twitter fight but was it really necessary for her to tweet that to the public? You have to know you have a Twitter population of just over 386,000 followers, take a step back and decide whether or not to hit the send button next time.

Did Mark Ingram take it a little bit too far? Maybe. If you throw the first jab on any social media outlet, expect backfire almost immediately. She was able to recover from all the backlash to explain the situation…

Oh and if you don’t know what Tales From The Crypt is referring to, here is a quick glance:

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Written by Jordan Maly

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