Indiana Democratic Party 8-15-20 Weekly Radio Address

Indiana Democratic Party 8-15-20 Weekly Radio Address

Chairman John Zody and the Indiana Democratic Party 8-15-20 Weekly Radio Address:

And guess what the Republicans’ big surprise was? No-fault absentee voting? Extending deadlines to deal with what could be delayed mail? No. It was to buy more letter opening machines.  Yep, that’s it. More machines – not more ways to vote for Hoosiers.

TRANSCRIPT:

This is Chairman John Zody, bringing you the weekly message for the Indiana Democratic Party. 

Yesterday, Indiana Republicans continued to show their true voter suppression colors during a meeting of the Indiana Election Commission.

A meeting was scheduled to discuss a number of items, with “General Election Planning” at the end of the agenda. Now mind you, the meeting was called by the Chair with the minimum required public notice, and no direction for the Democratic Commissioners was given prior to the meeting.

And guess what the Republicans’ big surprise was? No-fault absentee voting? Extending deadlines to deal with what could be delayed mail? No. It was to buy more letter opening machines.  Yep, that’s it. More machines – not more ways to vote for Hoosiers.

And the reason? Because of politics, plain and simple. Donald Trump doesn’t want it because he’s afraid he’ll lose. Mike Pence doesn’t want it. Eric Holcomb doesn’t want it.

Our Democratic Commissioners offered many important points that were, by the way, agreed to in the June 2 primary by both parties. All were ways to expand the right to vote – and all were rejected this time on party lines.

This issue is one that is gripping the country right now. 43 other states have decided to expand mail-in voting for the Nov. 3 election. Once again, Indiana is at the bottom when it comes to making sensible, safe and healthy decisions for its citizens.

And this all rests at the feet of Eric Holcomb and the Indiana Republican Party.

We have to keep up the fight to make sure the right to vote is protected and expanded for the November 3 election.  Here are some things you can do:

  1. Call Gov. Holcomb’s office at 317.232.4567 and tell him you believe we need no-fault absentee voting.
  2. Encourage your friends and family to request their ballot online at indianavoters.com to get it processed sooner. If someone can’t do that, tell them to request their ballot by filling out an application and getting to their local election office ASAP.
  3. Once they receive their ballot – tell them to get it returned ASAP. The Post Office has warned states that voters should not wait too long to mail ballots back.
  4. Vote for Democrats! Only with the right people in office can we get the right things done for Hoosiers – and I can assure you – that’s not happening right now.

The choice is clear. Interested in helping more? 

Volunteer for a candidate running for state office. Sign up at indems.org/join, and we’ll get you plugged in. Please follow the IDP on Facebook and Twitter. Simply search INDEMS – that’s I-N-D-E-M-S on Facebook and Twitter and follow us to get the latest news about our candidates and what we’re doing to hold our counterparts at the Statehouse and in Washington accountable. Thank you for listening.

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